Saturday, February 18, 2012

Marshall stack


Click for bigger. Front view.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Does it go to 11?

arbroath said...

Heh heh!

The BBC iPlayer does ...

http://i.imgur.com/Hvl2a.jpg

andiscandis said...

Ah, it's Marshall *stack*. Now I understand the line from that Beck song. Thanks!

TimO said...

When amp manufacturers went from heavy tubes and transformers to light efficient electronics there were also stories of players who opened up their amps and found bricks or lumps of iron bolted inside to give the customer a wallet-satisfying 'heft'.

Gareth said...

Something doesn't ring true about that shot. People off to the sides of the crowd would be able to see the stacks were fake. Strike one. It would be just as easy to build a realistic looking empty stack, or even install some genuine but not functional stacks. Strike two. Is it shopped or is was it actually a physically faked stack for some other reason?

When playing small pub venues I used speaker simulators on my stack because my 100 Watt head running into a pair of 4x12s would have been too loud for the venue. I still built the stack more for convenience sake than anything else. Having your amp knobs at eye level in a dimly lit pub is much better than crouching down on stage to peer at a head sitting on the box of a soak.

@TimO I've heard those tales, but they are unlikely to be true. The PSU transformer in my solid state live head made as heavy as the valve head I used in the studio. Secondly when solid state amps first came along manufacturers were pretty proud of their new electronics and tended to plaster "solid state" labels on them, so there would be no mileage in pretending they were valve heads.

A famous guitar player (no names, no pack drill) once told me everything he played from the eighties on was recorded on an amp simulator, but he always said in interviews he used valves as that was what the fans wanted to hear. Of course this suggests that the fans couldn't hear the difference anyway.